Heterotroph

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Heterotroph

Journal of Ecosystem and Ecography is an international open access journal which is celebrating 10th Anniversary , publishing the quality peer-reviewed research articles relevant to the field of Environmental Sciences.

As our journal has completed 10 years we are celebrating 10th anniversary we have announced almost 50 percent discount on article processing charge to commemorate its 10th Anniversary so we are inviting eminent researches,fellowmans, science students, scientists for the submission of their valuable,innovative articles which would be helpful to our journal publication in forth coming issue( volume10, issue 1) .

We would like to invite eminent researches to write a paper or short commentaries on the below discussed topics which would be helpful for the readers for their information

Submit manuscript at https://www.scholarscentral.org/submissions/ecosystem-ecography.html 

A heterotroph (/ˈhɛtərəˌtroʊf, -ˌtrɒf/; Ancient Greek ἕτερος héteros = "other" plus trophe = "nutrition") is an organism that cannot produce its own food, instead taking nutrition from other sources of organic carbon, mainly plant or animal matter. In the food chain, heterotrophs are primary, secondary and tertiary consumers, but not producers. Living organisms that are heterotrophic include all animals and fungi, some bacteria and protists, and many parasitic plants. The term heterotroph arose in microbiology in 1946 as part of a classification of microorganisms based on their type of nutrition. The term is now used in many fields, such as ecology in describing the food chain.

Heterotrophs may be subdivided according to their energy source. If the heterotroph uses chemical energy, it is a chemoheterotroph (e.g., humans and mushrooms). If it uses light for energy, then it is a photoheterotroph (e.g., green non-sulfur bacteria).

Heterotrophs represent one of the two mechanisms of nutrition (trophic levels), the other being autotrophs (auto = self, troph = nutrition). Autotrophs use energy from sunlight (photoautotrophs) or oxidation of inorganic compounds (lithoautotrophs) to convert inorganic carbon dioxide to organic carbon compounds and energy to sustain their life. Comparing the two in basic terms, heterotrophs (such as animals) eat either autotrophs (such as plants) or other heterotrophs, or both.

Journal Impact Factor 0.02* ; 1.5* (5 Year Journal Impact Factor)
 

Accepted manuscripts submitted before the deadline will be published within the given timeframe for the respective journal publication.

 

Contact:

Grace

Journal Manager

Journal of Ecosystem and Ecography